Emmisary Log: The Northern Trade pt. 1

November 3rd, T.A. 2017

After a busy month of repairing trade routs and planning caravans and resting, following my trade analysis of the great east road and the re-connection of the trade routes to the Misty Mountains, It has come time for improving our trade interests to the north. It would seem that there has been a decrease in the productivity of our trade caravans to the Ice region of Forochel. Many traders come back with the same amount of materials as they set out with originally and less and less resources are returning with them.

Lord Dwalin has sent me to establish our communication with the natives of that area and to reconnect our outpost there with the dwarves here at Thorin’s hall. Although I can admit that I am not nearly as excited to venture into those northern lands, I still understand the merit that this has. It is known of the furs and ivory that the natives of Forochel trade are above the quality of even some elven regions. The furs from the moose and elk there are extremely soft, and the saber-tooth and aurochs hides are of the warmest materials that money can buy.

The reestablishment and maintenance of a relationship is only going to help us gain access to these highly desired goods that we can then process and sell.

Seeing as the locals have been dealing with interference and difficulties from both the elements and from wild beasts ravaging their trade routes, their removal would aid in opening up the way for a renewed and prosperous trade between both people.

My first step of business was to assist in a trade with one of our own caravans to offer extremely fair prices to the Lossoth locals in Kauppa-Kohta, which is their southernmost camp and therefore the one that sees the most of the trade. This is of course the response of the traders from the dangers on the road, and prevents many, if not, most from venturing deeper into this region.

trade caravan

Thus this first camp is going to be our foundation for trade with the deeper camps in Forochel. We must see to it that there are guards and guides for the caravans and that there can be proper management of the road. These aspects are always the first to be neglected, though they are often the most important part of the trade routes. the roads are always going to be dangerous, and the need for protection will always be there. Here in Forochel this is true all the more.

Attacks on the road from wolves and wargs are a constant threat here. This stifles the trade between the settlements even between the peoples here. As a result there is less of a focus on trade and rather on craft. This causes a decrease in the openess for trade, and less of a focus on trade with the coming generations. It became evident that reconnecting the different settlements of the Lossoth in order to increase our trade-reach in this area.

I saw to it immediately that the greatest threats of the wags and local wargs were removed. This did prove to be a sort of challenge in that there was a great difficulty but nonetheless was eventually dealt with. This did earn some respect from the locals as there was a pre existing belief in that outsiders of Forochel could not deal with the difficulties that faces the Lossoth. It seems that they have not had much experience with dwarves in the past. I was happy to rectify their opinion and broaden their understanding for our race.

After that day of long hunting and fighting I remained at the settlement to rest and prepare to venture out towards Pynti-peldot, a large hunting outpost in the center of the region. With the provisions needed and some guidance from the locals I left or the second settlement hoping that the work their would be equally as effective as it had been so far, as well as hoping that the road would not prove too difficult.

The weather did was fair and there were patches of sun that morning. Though clouds continued through the rest of the day. The road rose up for a while on a soft gradient which was not a difficult trek even with snow and ice. The morning passed without too much difficulty. The second half of the day proved to be more of an adventure.

Through a long rift in the ice I traveled for a greater part of the day. Two glaciers had cracked and separated. and thought I don’t know how long the ice had remained like this, It was evident that the separation had swallowed the road that the ancient Lossoth used to use.

The ice valley was impressive, walls of cold, blue ice rose on both sides, some leaning and connecting overhead creating a cavern with a high ceiling that enclosed the traveler from some elements. The ice cavern became a rock cave as the hot steam vents burst through the ground and thawed the ice that covered them. this was welcome warmth from the several hours of exposure to the freezing cold.

There were more dangers on the road. Wolfmen were waiting on the exit to the cave and would attack on site if allowed to. By the request of the locals I removed them from the entrance and also removed their tokens of offense, clearing the road to the second encampment. There I worked to find some kind of understanding where the locals would permit trade with the dwarves that came out of the south and Zigilund as well.

In order to accomplish this I did what I could to assist in supplying and contributing in tribal rituals to display the dwarves’ flexibility of beliefs. This display of tolerance seem to have an effect on the locals and I have earned  the trust of the leader of the second camp. They were most gracious hosts and look forward to trading with the caravans that come from the south as  well as their own brethren.

Assisting

From here my road looks west to reconnect with our outpost at Zigilund where we can see how our researchers and hunters are faring in this rough land.  My aim is to assist in any way I can to prepare them for the reopened trade routs and ensure that th can provide a reliable stop for caravans looking to resupply or rest from travels.

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